First Grade

 

October: What is Grade 1 studying?


ELA: Building Classroom Community

Essential Question: How does an individual contribute to the classroom community?

Big Ideas: 

  • Students understand rules, drills, and other routines are necessary to help classroom community members learn and keep them safe and contribute to the atmosphere of the tone of the room. 
  • Students understand that readers need to think about what a reader looks like, sounds like, and feels like when they are reading and use a range of strategies to make sense of a text. 

Resources:

The Night Before First Grade by Natasha Wing

No David! by David Shannon

First Grade, Here I Come! by Nancy Carlson

Miss Nelson is Missing by Harry Allard

The Recess Queen by Alexis O'Neill

Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister

Jessica by Kevin Henkes

Rules and Laws (Non-Fiction)

 

Unit of Study: Families are Important

Essential Question: How are families unique? 

Big Idea:

Students understand that language, beliefs, customs and traditions help shape the identity and culture of a family and a community.

Resources:

Yum, Yum! (Mondo)

Families…

Dragon

Families are Special

Firefighters (Mondo)

One World – Many Cultures

Days of Adventure (Mondo)

In My Family by Carmen Garza

In the Wild (Mondo)

Families are Different

Signs of Spring (Mondo)

 

Writing: Narrative Writing

  • Students will begin brainstorming ideas for writing personal narratives by generating seed ideas. 
  • Students will craft small moments by generating ideas, writing LOTS of details, and crafting powerful endings. 
  • Students will begin to explore the writing process by recognizing and understanding the five steps. (Prewriting, Drafting, Revising, Editing, and Publishing)

 

Go Math!: 

Chapter 2: Students will use their understanding of addition and apply to subtraction concepts.

  • Use objects and pictures to show “taking from” and “taking apart”
  • Solve “taking apart” word problems using make a model
  • Compare pictorial groups
  • Model and compare groups to show subtraction
  • Identify how many are left
  • Build fluency for subtraction within 10

Chapter 3: Students will apply strategies for adding.

  • Understand and apply the Commutative Property
  • Use count on to find sums within 20
  • Use doubles to solve addition and subtraction problems
  • Use the strategies count on, doubles, doubles plus 1, and doubles minus 1 to practice facts
  • Use a ten frame and make a ten
  • Apply the Associative Property
  • Solve “adding to” and “putting together” situations using draw a picture


Common Core Learning Standards:

1.OA.A.1 - Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

1.OA.C.6 - Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

1.OA.D.8 - Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = _ - 3, 6 + 6 = _.

1.OA.A.2 - Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

1.OA.B.3 - Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

1.OA.C.5 - Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

1.OA.C.6 - Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).